Jurassic World Evolution Gameplay Review

I’ll be honest I went into Jurassic World Evolution terrified that it was going to be every bit as unintuitive as Frontier Developments’ previous game, Planet Coaster, which was so poor at explaining itself that I bounced off of it in 30 minutes flat. Luckily, that wasn’t the case here with JWE. The game never outright explains many of its systems, but the tutorial still holds your hand long enough for you to get your bearings, and the UI is surprisingly adept at explaining itself the rest of the way. And it’s a good thing this game lets you hit the ground running, because Jurassic World Evolution Game Play is extremely concerned with making sure you never get bored or have any downtime.

In addition to physically expanding your park, there’s a constant stream of side activities to do. Between assigning jobs to your park’s staff, going to dig sites for fossils, analyzing those fossils, incubating new dinosaurs, responding to emergencies, researching new technology, and expanding your park, there’s a ton of different stuff to track and do which, shockingly, makes Play Jurassic Park Evolution actually a fairly micromanagement heavy game.

Play Experience

I haven’t found a way to automate any of its systems, and when it only takes a few minutes to dig up more fossils or incubate a new dinosaur, that means you’re constantly coming back to these menus to go send another team out. I could see this being a dealbreaker for a lot of people. But for me personally, I found all the micromanagement actually pretty enjoyable as I flitted from menu to menu, working up a circular routine through all of my tasks, and fell into a zen state of flow.

If that’s not your speed, however, most tasks in this game don’t require your constant attention and can wait. It might be more efficient to send your expedition team back out the moment they come home, but you’re not on a time limit or anything, so if they idle for a minute or 20, it’s not a huge deal. There is a sole exception to that statement, however park rangers, who you often need to order to go do various timed tasks, such as medicating sick dinosaurs before they die or cleaning up bodies before they rot and get something sick. The timed nature of these tasks is aggravated by the seeming lack of a pause button or any other time manipulating controls.

Jurassic World Evolution

Panicking because all of a sudden YOUR DINOSAUR IS SICK AND IT IS DYING AND YOU NEED TO SAVE IT but you haven’t figured out how? Well, better hurry up and figure it out, because you can’t pause and that dino’s health is ticking down. Want to keep designing your next holding pen, but now a dinosaur died of old age? Well, guess you need to drop everything to go tell your transport staff to take care of it before it drives your guests off.

System Requirements for Jurassic World Evolution PC

MINIMUM:
Requires a 64-bit processor and operating system
OS: Windows 7 (SP1+)/8.1/10 64bit
Processor: Intel i5-2300/AMD FX-4300
Memory: 8 GB RAM
Graphics: NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1050 (Legacy GPU: GeForce GTX 660) / AMD Radeon 7850 (2GB)
DirectX: Version 11
Storage: 8 GB available space
RECOMMENDED:
Requires a 64-bit processor and operating system
OS: Windows 7 (SP1+) / 8.1/10 64bit
Processor: Intel i7-4770/AMD FX-8350
Memory: 12 GB RAM
Graphics: NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1060 / AMD RX 480
DirectX: Version 11
Storage: 12 GB available space

RECOMMENDED:
Requires a 64-bit processor and operating system
OS: Windows 7 (SP1+) / 8.1/10 64bit
Processor: Intel i7-4770/AMD FX-8350
Memory: 12 GB RAM
Graphics: NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1060 / AMD RX 480
DirectX: Version 11
Storage: 12 GB available space

Want more money? Just going to have to sit and wait since you can’t fast forward. It’s a bit of a bizarre oversight on the developers’ part. The ability to pause is so ubiquitous in games like this that I’m half convinced I just never found the button to do it. There’s something to be said for how not being able to pause contributes to the panic factor in the event of a dino breaking loose and threatening your entire park, and that feeling of things spiraling out of control is very thematically in line with the IP the game’s based on, but when you’re just trying to build a new enclosure and have to go clean up a dino corpse for the third time, immersion is the last thing on your mind.

If you do somehow find some spare downtime, you can take direct control of your park rangers, drive your little jeep around, and take pictures of dinosaurs for an extra, minor trickle of money. You can also manually do many of the rangers’ tasks, and often do them far better than they can. And the game will occasionally give you a contract that incentivizes driving around for a bit to take a picture of a particular dinosaur. Those contracts will inform the main direction of your short term goals.

Your park staff is separated into three divisions — science, entertainment, and security — that all give you contracts with short term goals like take pictures of a dinosaur or go collect a few fossils. Making one division happy gives you special unlocks, but makes the others feel neglected, and when they feel neglected, they throw a temper tantrum and sabotage your park, so you have to balance out who you pay attention to. Luckily, this balancing act isn’t much of a challenge.

Jurassic World Evolution

As long as you do one contract for each group, they all still stay happy and you get a net gain in loyalty. I was actually surprised by how enjoyable interacting with my division heads was. Mind you, there’s nothing earthshattering here. Everyone is still pretty much a demanding one-note personality, but I’m so used to dry advisors that become nonexistent as soon as the tutorial is over and the usual bar is so low that I found JWE’s advisors refreshing.

So let’s get to the verdict. Having completed one of JWE’s main islands and laid the foundation on a second in the Jurassic World Evolution Games, I would say that you can actually get a pretty complete and entertaining experience out of this game in five hours. You obviously won’t have seen and done everything, but you can fill out a pretty satisfying park in that amount of time. And, well, I’ve still got another four and a half islands left, so yeah, I’d keep playing. Overall, the first few islands of Jurassic World Evolution have been more bark than bite. Division heads might try to sabotage your work, but keeping them content and in line is a cakewalk.

Conclusion of Games

Keeping with the series’ themes, much ado is made about how dinosaurs can and will break free of their pens and make your life a living hell, but as long as they’re happy, they never really try. It’s entirely possible that this changes later on as more environmental dangers start popping up to complicate the situation, but for the most part, Jurassic World Evolution is a fairly relaxing, if perhaps busy, way to live out your dream as dino park manager. Hey, I hope you enjoyed this episode of First Five.

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